Medicine for the Earth Shamanism Newsletter Fall 2010

Shamanism_at_the_edge__shamanism_retreat_centre__near_toronto__ontario_-_canada

6th Advanced Shamanism Training begins soon!

Click here to watch the video.

November 19 – 21 is the first gathering for the next Advanced Shamanism Training at Northern Edge Algonquin. We are still accepting applications. Are you ready to answer the call to deepen your Spiritual practice of Shamanism? We invite you to watch the video of current shamanism circle members sharing how this training has affected them.

Please contact our office, where Amanda is available to listen and help answer any questions you may have about the 2 year training, 1-800-953-3343.

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Ceremony for Remembering and Honouring

By Members of the Peaceful Heart’s Circle

A few weeks ago our Peaceful Heart’s Circle gathered with the intention to ‘recognize and respect our ancestors as we evolve on our authentic path’. Weaving together the information from our journeys we entered into ceremony to acknowledge, respect, and recognize our ancestors, while honoring their stories and restoring their honor where it had been tarnished. The intention included soldiers and their families who have been affected by war. We moved forward, guided by Spirit, along the evolving authentic path that each of us is walking step by step.

Under a starry night, we gathered around a beautiful fire, placing into the flame that which was ready to be released, baring ourselves as we bared our alter of the beautiful collection of leaves, feathers, berries and flowers that we had gathered.

We danced under the stars with eyes closed, listening to the stories that the Spirit of the Land held for us and shared these stories that wished to be heard, recognized and honoured. We prepared ourselves to step onto our authentic path with a blessing from one another and the Spirit of water.

On the next day, the children who were present taught us a beautiful song of ‘Remembering’. We continued our ceremony by singing the song while walking along an old path lined with trees and rose bushes that had been planted by the ancestors, who silently stood listening while baring witness to what was unfolding.

There was an army of soldiers marching behind as the youngest child led us singing the song of Remembering. They were marching with us as we drummed and rattled behind her. The army of soldiers grew and grew. They were marching in rhythm, with pride, and singing a song that lifted their Spirits and honoured their courage and their best intentions. They were moved by our invitation to restore the sense of their own worthiness, even as the pain of everything that has transpired in reality was not thrust aside.

We arrived in an area where we started to gather in a circle. An acorn was placed on the ground in the centre of our circle. Then one of the soldiers placed his rifle in the centre of the circle. Another added his, then another and another. A huge tipi of rifles, a kind of swelling pyre of rifles started to grow as each soldier stepped forward and then stepped back.

A mast arose amidst the gathered rifles and a peace flag was raised slowly and with patience. The flag was picked up by the wind, rustling and sweeping its message of peace. Then the acorn was buried in the ground. The youngest child did this, with the assistance of one of our ‘peaceful warriors’. As the acorn grows into a beautiful oak, it holds the name: “The Oak of Peace”.

We were all conscious of the families whose brothers and fathers never came home. And we were also conscious of those soldiers who came home so pained that they were never the same. All through this weekend, we had been honouring our ancestors, their stories and the stories held by the spirit of the land. This ceremony was the culmination of our time together.

At this time of Remembering, may we acknowledge the stories within and all around us, offering gratitude to those who walked before us.

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Song: Canadian Soldier

He was a brave Canadian soldier

And he was young and he was strong

He never shied away from danger

Some say it’s right, some say it’s wrong

His noble heart would not surrender

The night grew fierce, some hid, some cried

Come morning light, will they remember?

The way he fought, the way he died.

In foreign lands, the wind is sighing

The rain has come and washed away

The tears that fell while he lay dying

A mother’s child has passed away

So bow your head, and stand in silence

Then lift your eyes and sing the song

About a brave, Canadian soldier

The gift he gave, the life that’s gone.

He was a brave Canadian soldier

And he was young and he was strong

He never shied away from danger

Some say it’s right, some say it’s wrong.

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Join our FREE Community Circle to view:

The Condor of the South once again shares the sky with The Eagle of the North

Gail Beech and Walter Cooke share their experience at Northern Edge Algonquin recently. We were privileged to host one of the largest spiritual gatherings ever held at The Edge with don Martin Pinedo Acuna (“El Condor”, the condor shaman) and Marco Nunez Zamolloa (shaman and teacher) who were visiting from the Cuzco district of Peru.

Please visit our new gathering space circle.northernedgealgonquin.com to read more.

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Sounds of the Solar System with David Hickey

Click here to view David Hickey’s performance on our new media & gathering site.
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